Stop The Nagging With Your Partner Over Weight Loss

There’s no question that couples who are close stay “in sync” in many ways. One of the more eye-opening discoveries that has come from recent studies, however, is that couples are also likely to stay in synch as far as their weight goes. A study recently published in the journal, Obesity, finds that couples will tend to mimic each other as far as their weight goes. This trend apparently stays the same regardless whether the weight goes up or down.

One Tries to Lose Weight, And The Other Doesn’t

The study, which was lead by psychologist Amy Gorin of the University of Connecticut, found that couples do tend to keep abreast of each other as far as their weight gains or losses. What was interesting in the findings is that this is true even when only one partner in the couple is trying to lose weight. The couples in the study were followed as one partner signed up with a weight loss system, like Image Weight Loss. The other partner in the couple did not sign up with any type of weight loss plan, yet their degree of weight loss was close to the level of the partner who was trying to lose weight. The couples who took part in the study did have to have to be found to be overweight in order to be admitted into the research group.

The syncing up of the weight loss is called a “ripple effect,” and it seems to be a consistent pattern in couples. One of the conclusions the researchers came to at the end of the study is that a partner who consistently nags their spouse about losing weight might have more success by taking on a reverse psychology approach. In that case, the nagging partner might have more success by stopping the nagging and instead signing up for a serious weight loss plan themselves. If the one partner starts losing weight, the odds are that other partner will, too. That approach might help both people slim down, and ease the tension at home that can come from nonstop nagging.